Jan 21, 2011

Lithops 101

Lithops spp. (Living Stones)

Lithops is a genus of succulent plants native to Southern Africa. "Lithos" means "stone" and "-ops" means "face" in Ancient Greek; therefore "Lithops" means "stone-like". The formation of the name from the Greek "ops" means that even a single plant is called a Lithops. This is a very good description of these plants, which avoid being eaten by blending in with surrounding rocks. They are also called ‘pebble plants’.

The genus Lithops is in the family of Aizoaceae, which also includes the various forms of plants known as "Ice Plants" and those called "Mimicry Plants". Lithops are commonly called Living Stones because of their remarkable resemblance to rocks on the ground. In a rock covered landscape, they are nearly indistinguishable from actual stones. In fact, the plant’s ability to blend in using its color and shape is the most startling adaptation of Living Stones. The leaves are not green as with many foliage plants, but various shades of cream, grey, brown, reddish browns, purplish browns, and grass-greens with a myriad of patterns such as darker windowed areas and designs, dots, red lines and areas known as "islands".

There are well over 300 types of Lithops. Several types differ in nearly all areas including texture, size and color. They may look similar, but are in fact very unique. No two Living Stone plants are going to look exactly alike. They are popular novelty house plants and many specialist succulent growers maintain collections.

Individual plants consist of one or more pairs of bulbous, nearly fused leaves opposite to each other and hardly any stem. The slit between the leaves contains the meristem and produces flowers and new leaves— leaves which are mostly buried below the surface of the soil. They have a characteristic top to the leaf which is a partially (or completely) translucent surface (or window) allowing light to enter the interior of the leaves for photosynthesis.

Lithops are extremely succulent bilobes (up to 90% water). A single body can be to 1.5" in diameter, and is split by a central "cleft", creating the "bi-lobed" body. Many species eventually form clusters, and in the native habitat, clusters gradually spread to from large colonies of Lithops that can span 6 feet in diameter. The rarer green forms occur naturally in grassy areas, while the browns, tans and other colors occur in quartz fields, providing an example of a phenomenon known as "mimicry" in which a plant, insect or animal can become almost completely camouflaged by its surroundings and is virtually undetectable. This ability to blend in helps Lithops avoid predators – The markings on the leaves disguise the plant in its surroundings from hungry animals that would otherwise feast on its tender, fleshy bodied leaves.

Climate: Lithops occur naturally across wide areas of Namibia and South Africa, as well as small bordering areas in Botswana and possibly Angola, from sea level to high mountains. Nearly a thousand individual populations are documented, each covering just a small area of dry grassland, veld, or bare rocky ground. Different Lithops species are preferentially found in particular environments, usually restricted to a particular type of rock. Lithops have not naturalized outside this region.

Rainfall in Lithops habitats ranges from approximately 700mm/year to near zero. Rainfall patterns range from exclusively summer rain to exclusively winter rain, with a few species relying almost entirely on dew formation for moisture. Temperatures are usually hot in summer and cool to cold in winter, but one species is found right at the coast with very moderate temperatures year round.

Lithops often survive many years of drought with nothing more than seasonal fogs. These plants have evolved a strategy that enables them to absorb and store moisture from these scant fogs. As our climate is much more humid than that of Africa, Lithops can absorb much of its required moisture from the air.

Growth Habit: Lithops tend to grow in the winter and rest in the summer, contrary to many other plants! During winter a new leaf pair, or occasionally more than one, grows inside the existing fused leaf pair. In spring the old leaf pair parts to reveal the new leaves and the old leaves will then dry up. The leaves may shrink and disappear below ground level during drought. Within their native habitat, plants almost never have more than one leaf pair per head, the environment is just too arid to support this. Yellow or white flowers emerge from the fissure between the leaves after the new leaf pair has fully matured, one per leaf pair. This is usually in autumn, but can be before the summer equinox in L. pseudotruncatella and after the winter equinox in L. optica. The flowers are often sweetly scented.

After the plant flowers, the plant will rest for a short time. Then from the middle again two new leaves will start to form. They will take all the moisture and nutrients from the old leaves. This is why it is important not to water/fertilize (it will disrupt the process). The old leaves will shrivel and die and the new ones will come in and replace the old ones. After that point in time it is safe to resume watering/fertilizing!

Lithops' fruit is a dry capsule that opens when it becomes wet; some seeds may be ejected by falling raindrops, and the capsule re-closes when it dries out. Capsules may also sometimes detach and be distributed intact, or may disintegrate after several years.

Summer Dormancy vs. Winter Growth: Normal treatment in mild temperate climates is to keep them completely dry during winter, watering only when the old leaves have dried up and been replaced by a new leaf pair. Watering continues through autumn when the plants flower and then stopped for winter. The best results are obtained with additional heat such as a greenhouse. In hotter climates, the plant will have a summer dormancy when they should be kept mostly dry, and they may require some water in winter. In tropical climates, Lithops can be grown primarily in winter with a long summer dormancy. In all conditions, Lithops will be most active and need most water during autumn and each species will flower at approximately the same time.

Soil Type: Lithops thrive best in a coarse, well-drained substrate. Any soil that retains too much water will cause the plants to burst their skins as they over-expand. Plants grown in strong light will develop hard strongly colored skins which are resistant to damage and rot, although persistent overwatering will still be fatal. Excessive heat will kill potted plants as they cannot cool themselves by transpiration and rely on staying buried in cool soil below the surface.

Lithops requires a porous soil; note that very excellent drainage can be attained by the addition of extra pumice or other coarse material. It is preferable that the soil does not contain much organic material, such as peat moss and that the plant is not fertilized with heavy nitrogen as this can cause an explosion of soft, flabby growth that can make the plant prone to bacterial rots. Another good mix would be 40% peat moss and 60% perlite to allow even faster drainage.

What pot should I use for my Living Stones? In my opinion, plastic or terracotta pots are best. Since Living Stones are a succulent, a terracotta pot will not only fit the succulent theme (sand, rocks, deserts, etc) but also might help the plant dry out a bit easier. Since terracotta is porous, water goes through it easily, helping the pot dry out as well as the plant – especially if it’s in a sunny location! You could also use a glazed pot if you desire. In design terms, a glass container would look striking and allow you to watch the plants’ roots grow and develop—a very cool idea, indeed! Just be sure the glass container has a drainage hole. Many glass containers do NOT normally have a drainage hole, so please be cautious!

Light: Lithops requires full to very bright sun (either direct or indirect). Shade will kill this plant! It can take full strength sun, but be mindful of sun burning the leaves (I know this from personal experience). If your plant is in full sun, be sure to water every week (instead of every two--see below).

A window facing West, South or East should do nicely. Too much light is not a problem for Living Stones. Too little light is! If the plant appears to be 'reaching' for the window or light source, it needs more light! Stretching will cause the Living Stones to lose their rock like appearance and grow taller. If this begins happening, simply find another place with more light.

In the wintertime during active growth, you may want to move Living Stones closer to a window – they need as much light as possible when producing new leaves. The rest of the year, they still need sufficient light, but even if they aren’t right next to a window, be sure they can get some bright sunlight. Where you place your plants really depends on your window access (a house may have several whereas an apartment or other place may have only one or two) and your available space for plants. If you’re already obsessed with plants, the chances are good your space may be limited! The good news is: Living Stones tend to be small kept singly or in clusters. Plants grow slowly and don’t need huge pots or containers. If your plant space is limited, Living Stones may be a plant for you!

Watering: Keep plants barely moist! Overwatering is the most common problem people have with Living Stones. Overwatering will result in the death of this plant 9 times out of 10. One Lithops expert once remarked in regard to watering Lithops: "When in doubt, don't". During the cold winter months, watering should be light and infrequent once again, until such as time as the days grow longer and the temperature begins to warm a bit.

Generally, Lithops will do best being watered about once every two or three weeks (when not in active growth or flowering). Tap water or distilled water is fine. Treat it as a cactus. The plant can take a 'misting' every other day if desired, but this is not required. Be sure not to overwater! It will take up all the water that is put in the pot, even if its too much!

This next part is very important!!  Keep in mind, watering requirements will change throughout the year depending on which season you are currently in!! Lithops is a very unique succulent with unique watering requirements. Since overwatering is the number one cause of death for Lithops, it’s imperative growers learn exactly when (and when not) to water. For this reason, keeping these plants alive takes a bit of time and skill!

Spring:
The plant is dormant now. Water only if the leaves appear wrinkled.


Summer:
During the hot summer months the plants will be dormant and watering should be light and infrequent, only enough should be given to prevent the plants from shriveling or appearing "wrinkled".

Fall:
After the hottest part of summer, as autumn approaches, the plant will use most of its stored energies to flower. The appearance of buds signals the start of another watering period. Plants should be watered enough during this time that the bodies remain turgid, or, in other words, do not become "wrinkled". Watering should be thorough, but less frequently than for other succulents.

After the flower dies off, ALL WATERING/FERTILIZING SHOULD BE STOPPED!!

Winter:
Water should be withheld as the new leaves begin to appear in the cleft during winter time. You must do this so that newly forming leaves are allowed to absorb the moisture from the old leaves, or the plant will be more prone to rot and the new plant formed will be smaller than before, rather than growing larger as it should. When it is apparent that the new leaves have absorbed the moisture from the old leaves ~ nothing but a dry husk will remain of the old leaves ~ that is the signal that it is time to begin watering normally again.

What happens if I overwater?
If you have consistently overwatered Living Stones, it will likely die, especially if planted in the wrong kind of soil (soil that retains lots of water, such as peat moss). If you’ve only overwatered once or twice, the plant will fill itself with water and ‘bulge’ out. Anymore water at this point can burst the leaves. Your best option is to withhold watering again until the leaves have once more reduced to normal size. Water thoroughly when soil is dry to the touch during the active growing periods. If the plant is shriveled during the non-growing periods, water a very little bit, just so the leaves perk up.

I repeat, if too much water is given at ANY time, the plant will swell and then split. If this happens, you cannot go back!! Take care when watering, and water sparingly. Take note of the seasons, and be confident in your Green Thumb!

Temperature: Living Stones will do fine in just about any temperature that it is given. Naturally found in the deserts of South Africa, the plant will do fine with hotter temperatures. Lithops are somewhat cold tolerant, but it is advisable to provide frost protection to prevent possible scarring. Colder temperatures are okay, but by no means ideal. Do not allow your plant to freeze. If this happens, the plant will die. Lithops prefers a wide spectrum of temperatures above 50 degrees, pushing into the 90-100 degree range (that being the absolute hottest the plant can handle). Ideally, you want your plant to thrive at a temperature around 65 to 75 degrees.

Flowering: Flowers appear from August to November, depending upon the species, and usually open in late afternoon, but open on multiple days. At this time, the plant is nearly obscured by flower heads to 1" in diameter that are composed of frilly, satiny yellow or white petals.

Living Stones will typically bloom in the fall. A blooming plant means it is at least 2 to 3 years old (juvenile plants cannot bloom since they need a ton of energy to do so). Only mature plants that are well cared for will bloom. Often times Living Stones only bloom in greenhouse environments or for professional growers. If your plant does bloom, it must like its location and current conditions! Daisy-like flowers of white or yellow last about a week and then die. Give the plant no water or fertilizer when it’s flowering, as this will interrupt the natural cycle (something you should avoid!)

Propagation: Propagation of Lithops is best done by seed or cuttings. Cuttings can only be used to produce new plants after a plant has naturally divided to form multiple heads, so most propagation is by seed. Lithops can readily be pollinated by hand, and seed will be ripe about 9 months later. Seed is easy to germinate, but the seedlings are small and vulnerable for the first year or two.

Fertilization: Fertilizer is a requirement that is of some debate with growers. To play it safe use a diluted amount of 20-20-20 plant food (about 1/4 strength) will be fine about once a month. Do not exceed this amount! After the plant flowers in late fall/early winter, no fertilizer should be applied to the plant until after the new growth comes in.

Reproduction: Living Stones will reproduce themselves by runner (a 'root' that will spread out). A new plant will come up (usually by the parent.)

Do’s and Dont’s:
Do not water or fertilize your plant when it is producing new leaves. This will disrupt the process which it needs to complete uninterrupted at this time.

Do not overwater your plant. It will swell and sometimes split. If this happens special chemicals will need to be applied so that bacteria does not enter the plant and cause it to die. If this is not done in time, the plant must be discarded and replaced.

Do give Lithops adequate fresh air and bright, indirect light. Full sun is excellent when and if the plant(s) are properly acclimated to the sunlight. If they have been grown in partial sun before being moved, move them steadily up to the window a little at a time over a period of about 2 weeks or so. By the end of 2 weeks, the plant will be fully acclimated to a full sun environment and will likely not sun burn!

In all, Lithops may seem like a daunting plant to successfully grow in the home, but with the proper education and patience, you can (and will) succeed. Pay attention closely to the watering requirements with this plant. I cannot over state this enough! If you have any questions about Lithops or other succulents, please email me at: espressomocha86@hotmail.com Please include pictures of the plant(s) in question if at all possible! Friend me on Facebook at: www.facebook.com/eirinn.cunningham

Leave me a comment below this post! I appreciate your readership!! I hope your day is truly amazing…May your plants enrich and restore your spirit!

92 comments:

  1. Wonderful article, thank you so much.

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    Replies
    1. Thank you so much for this thorough description. since these plants are nativr to South Africa and their seasone are the reverse of ours, which time schedule should we follow? Our winter or theirs?

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    2. South Africa and Australia are both in the southern hemisphere, hence have the same seasons (e.g.Winter starts in the middle of the year)

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  2. Of course you are more than welcome. =)

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  3. Wonderful, clear an straightforward information for a newbie to this lovely plant! Thank you.

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  4. Replies
    1. need pictures of neck rot but otherwise its....hmmm.....AWESOME!!!!!!!!

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    2. I am fascinated by this plant. Would one do well under a gro-lux light? Bobbie

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    3. According to what I read on lithops.net, they will grow fine under light. They need to be within 12 in. of the tube, and have a day from 12 to 14 hours long.

      http://www.lithops.net/learn.htm

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  5. Can you mix living stones - such as Lithops with Argyroderma ovale and Pleiospilos nelii

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  6. Yes. While these 2 plants you mentioned are similar to Lithops, they are not one in the same -- and this people tend to easily misunderstand.

    They are related, however. Treat them similarly: water them very infrequently, (only when they appear shriveled), and always remember, if they appear firm, withold water! Watering at that point could damage the plant! Give them bright light at all times and make sure they do not sunburn. Lastly, use a well draining mix such as perlite, vermiculite and cactus mix. Keep it as light as possible - allow the mix to completely dry on top, and use the plant itself to indicate when watering is needed.

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  7. Maybe the most informative and concise article for a newby I have found. I've been looking ardently for several weeks.

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  8. Thank you so much for this article, read many before this and found it very confusing, now I finally know how to water and when

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  9. Hi! Wonderful article. This is my second attempt with lithops. I just got a small plant and I re-potted it but did not water it. The soil mix I used is the same I used for my jade plant which I've had for over 2 months now and it is thriving. Is this a good mix for the lithops? I have several other succulents and they all seem to like the mix.

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  10. I like this and is very useful info. I stay in tropical region in Singapore.
    Growing lithops is very much challenge compare to cactus here due to it's humidity, no seasons and rainy always.

    But it is very interesting of growing it. I used to be Growing it and had stopped due to my inexperience and give up.

    Now, can you tell and teach me How do start this cultivation.
    Appreciate for your sharing.

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  11. very thorough writing

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  12. Great post Eirinn! Very helpful indeed. Thank you for sharing your knowledge. I have just purchased some new Lithops, and it was a wonderful feeling when I first opened the box to see them in the flesh! I am also growing some Lithops from seeds, and I've read that they are a challenging plant to look after and propagate, but good things come to those who are patient, and I know that Lithops are worth the wait and hard work! Hope you're having fun at your neck of the woods! G'day from Sydney, Australia. :-)

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  13. I just purchased to new lithops today and am very excited to not kill them this time! Thank you!

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  14. very helpful thank you. I thought my plant wasn't doing well because the out leaves kept dying. Now that I know that's what its supposed to do I think I can take better care of it.

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    Replies
    1. Good luck to you. Email me, if you have any further questions!

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  15. thanks for all the great info. I was trying to find some info on what to do with a lithops that has been torn (just one of the leaves towards the bottom)by my 2yr old. if you could give some advice i would appreciate it. thanks again

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  16. thank's for the great info, very usefull for beginner like me...

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  17. I liked the article.it is helpful I just got one but can they be warmed with heating lamps? that is if you don't get very much sunlight on a certain side of the street?

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  19. Bought my first Lithop today!
    Thank you for all the information!!

    ReplyDelete
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  23. Fantastic and informative article. Thank you very much for taking the time to write it. My lithiops was in a less than optimum location, and as a result grew a little leggy trying to get some sun. I moved it to an eastern window, and it stopped "stretching." Will it go back to it's normal height with it's next leaf cycle?

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  30. What happens if the sides splits open, what caused it and is miracle-grow climate control potting soil ok for the lithops?

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  31. Great article - thank you. Could you shed some light on one issue - my lithop is dividing like mad - some heads seem to have divided twice this year already. Could this be overwatering, or just superb care?!

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    Replies
    1. Seems like Superb Care :) Very nice

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    2. You are doing a great job ! Keep up the excellent work ! :D

      Delete
  32. thanks for the great article. my lithops was starting to flower and I wasn't sure if I should water it or not! it is really wrinkly. I decided it was a good time to give a good watering. I killed two this spring by overwatering so now I've been scared to water it. haha. also when I over watered this spring, it grew kind of tall. I think it's the species that does that but I do wonder if it's ok for the plant to do that. But I guess it must be fairly healthy if it's trying to flower!

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  33. I'm having trouble with mine. I don't think I'm over-watering...I give them about 1 tsp whenever they are dry, but they seem to be decaying...One is getting a hole in it. Do you have any advise?

    Thanks.

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    Replies
    1. I have a multitude of lithops in my windowsill in Northern California. I never water over the top of them. It kills them. I also only water from Mothers Day to Labor Day. It has always worked and get beautiful blooms. Tempting to water in January, but wait till May.

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  34. A really good article with adequate information.

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  35. thanks that huge help.

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  36. What a well written article, thank you so much! I've just bought four Lithops and with your help here, I'm hoping they live a long and happy life at my home. I don't have a sunny window during summer so left them outside and it's been raining since I got them, so I am a bit worried now that I've read about their watering requirements. I'll now bring them in when it rains. I love them and hope to get all the different ones as time goes on. I have sun coming through my window all winter, so they will be happy indoors then I hope.

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    Replies
    1. Hi Friend, You might want to take care of them now as I faced unexpected rain and it has almost destroyed the plant :(

      Good Luck

      Delete
  37. Nice article. I bought one couple of weeks back. The soil was still wet. And it rained a couple of days after that and then again. There were two more eaves coming up from inside and one of them has died. I hope the other one will survive. How long do I wait until I water again....? Don't want to take any risk....

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  38. fellow plant lover, your article was wonderful and very helpful. I planted seeds about a month ago and they r still so tiny. How long before they can be replanted into good soil? I put them in a shallow long plastic pot so they have only about 1" of soil. I don't water them but spray them daily. doing good so far. Have about 25 plants. but want to give them a better "home".
    thanks again for the good info..

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  39. Thank you for your wonderful article. I have always had my Lithops outside on my covered front porch. The get morning sun. I have had blossoms now and then and they are so pretty. I had no idea they are easy to grow from seed. I've seen seed packets for Lithops now just for fun I want to buy a pack and plant them. I would love to know if a shallow terracota plant saucer would be okay to use.

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  40. Excellent article Eirinn. This is the best article I have ever seen on these plants. I learned alot more than I ever knew about them. I bought three plants today and really want to not kill them this time. Thank you!

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  41. Thank you so much! I just got three of them, and well organized information like this seemed to be hard to come by!

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  42. I just got my first split rock plant and baby toes plant, should I treat the baby toes the same way
    Loved the article, thanks

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  43. I found what will kill a Lithop faster than anything is watering over the top of leaves. I live in California and have my plants in a windowsill in full sun. I only water from Mothers Day to Labor Day. That's it. Bloom every year and look great.

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  44. I found what will kill a Lithop faster than anything is watering over the top of leaves. I live in California and have my plants in a windowsill in full sun. I only water from Mothers Day to Labor Day. That's it. Bloom every year and look great.

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  45. My seeds have sprouted into tiny seedlings. There are about thirty of them doing very well. But a few are somehow lying on their side. I'd like to know if I should prop them up. The only worry is that they just a few millimetres long. None of the articles mention how to care for the tiny babies.

    Where I live, it is very hot most of the year, so I give them indirect sunlight. How do I water the babies? So far they have done well, and now I am misting them once a day as the soil gets dry by the next morning.

    Can I repot the seedlings that are lying on their side? Or is it too early?

    Please help.

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  46. thx for the info. I water my split rock weekly during the winter because we have a woodstove. it grew a total of 3 levels,never bloomed then i put it outside during the late afternoon during this spring,never leaving it out during rain, and the bottom 2 levels just started melting and i had to replant the top. this is my 1st mimicry.

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  47. Thank you for the detailed information! May I ask when is a good time to move them to a new pot when it gets too crowded? And how? Thanks!

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  48. Eirinn: GREAT post on these guys-best out there!!! Wish I'd found it yesterday morn cuz my little guy I'd had a couple of months was doing great (had the new little leaves in the 'crack' of it's Momma!!!) and I WATERED IT AAUUGGHH AND IT 'MELTED.'
    Now I know better for the next one!
    (Magna: I think 'your' summer means 'it's' Summer, too. My little guy had just started putting out new leaves within the last week, before I killed it. I'd gotten it in June as a gift and it sat outside for a couple of weeks in it's tiny little 'big box' plastic pot b/f I put it in a 6" clay pot. Then moved it inside, sitting just inside a South window that's a little indirect. It was happy there (we're in Ohio.) So I'd just follow your location's seasons, since it's probably doing that.

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  49. Eirinn, thank you for this wonderful article. Question I live a the tropical rainforest with hot humid temperatures. Can you please let me know what the best watering schedule is for this climate since your article refers to four seasons. I have four lithops which I have only misted since I got them (8 months now) and they were slowly drying so and an hour ago I decided to water them for the first time. One of them looks like its already going to die. My potting mis consists of 70% pumice and 30% coars builders sand since that is what I could found. Thanks again and hope you can give me some advice.
    Annie

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  50. Wow. Wished I read this before I killed two with -- you guessed it -- watering. I just bought a third. Let's hope I don't go 0 for 3...but honestly, with all this good info, #3 has at least a chance at survival. Thank you, thank you!

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    Replies
    1. Hi.im frm india.the article is v.good and truly informative.my concern is whether the info help in india specialy in kolkata.?? Rply.

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  51. Great information. Wish I could find them here in the Atlanta area.

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  52. Thank you for a wonderful article. I just purchased a (another) Lithops and now I won't make the same mistakes that I did before. Thanks again.
    Barb N

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  53. Thank you so much for this informative article. I´ve enjoyed reading about how to care for these quirky and unusual little succulents. Some of the readers´ comments were helpful too – that is if one quickly scrolls past the impertinent, irrelevant and uninteresting slimming advice.
    I just have one question. I bought some “living stones” just a couple of days ago. They´re in a tiny plastic pot and some are almost hanging over the side. I´ve heard that many succulents and cacti prefer to be pot-bound and I was wondering when, if ever, I should transplant them into a slightly larger pot.

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  54. Your blog is informative.This non-hazardous decimation operator is not difficult to utilize, practical and a more secure choice for noiselessly separating hard materials like rock or cement. Non Explosive Demolition Agent

    ReplyDelete
  55. My plant has gone soft and has a mushy spot by the base
    Is it to far gone to save ?
    What went wroung?

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  56. Very helpful indeed. Thankyou

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  57. Best article I've read for any succellent. It's the first year that I tried growing these. So far so good. I did notice withering on one leaf. It has flowered and put two new leaves out. Trying to figure out if it's part of the cycle or two much watering. All the others in the pot are fine. This one is the only one that flowered and put out leaves. Thank you for being so detailed on growing these amazing succellents.

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  58. Great article! Great pictures! Just the information I was hoping to find! Thank you.

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  59. Great article! Great pictures! Just the information I was hoping to find! Thank you.

    ReplyDelete
  60. I have had lithops for a number of years. It is hard to find stores that carry them around here. Luck of the draw. I had four plants for about 3 years with no changes in location or temperature and watered them as required then all of a sudden they died. One little one lived. I have since bought 3 more and they are thriving. What do you think may have happened to the other three?

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  61. Hi, I've overwatered my almost adult seedlings and one of them split horizontally, parallel to the soil. What can I do? I've stopped watering them, but can I still save that one? You mentioned that chemicals have to be applied to the split area. What kind of chemicals?
    Thanks!
    Dana

    ReplyDelete
  62. This was so helpful and interesting! I want to start growing lithops, but I wanted to make sure I knew at least a little about what to do before I jump in. Gunna order some seeds this weekend!

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  63. Thanks for the information,have some problems with my lithop, some burst n die, some get wrinkle. In live in Malaysia hot n humid.will take some PIC and ask for your advice

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  64. Enjoyed reading. Thanks for this good online resource for lithops. We have cactus and succulents, and now are trying to grow lithops. The watering requirements are essential and you have explained them very well.

    North America, zone 7

    ReplyDelete
  65. Hello I read your article. My son bought me a stone plant last yr. Never watered it but the day I got it and today.
    Had it one full year before I watered it again weird thing though is it has 4 leaves and not 2. Is that normal.
    And I think it's leaving again. For two more leaves or inside the second two leaves.
    Today is the second time I watered it.
    The bottom leaves never dried out I waited and waited and waited. April come still alive aND well. Now it's August and it still has 4 leaves and looks to appear 2 more in the second set of leaves.
    Is this normal. I mean the plant looks great really great.
    Like I said I don't really give it water. Just one last yr and again today.

    ReplyDelete
  66. Hello I read your article. My son bought me a stone plant last yr. Never watered it but the day I got it and today.
    Had it one full year before I watered it again weird thing though is it has 4 leaves and not 2. Is that normal.
    And I think it's leaving again. For two more leaves or inside the second two leaves.
    Today is the second time I watered it.
    The bottom leaves never dried out I waited and waited and waited. April come still alive aND well. Now it's August and it still has 4 leaves and looks to appear 2 more in the second set of leaves.
    Is this normal. I mean the plant looks great really great.
    Like I said I don't really give it water. Just one last yr and again today.

    ReplyDelete
  67. How to take care of plants during holidays? Choose the pots; make sure there are holes in the bottom of your container to allow water to flow out freely, etc.

    ReplyDelete
  68. I bought lithops seeds. They are coming up, a pair of leaves. But they don't look like lithops. It looks like a plant with slim stem. Its green right now and a week old since the leaves appeared. Is it really lithops?

    ReplyDelete
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  70. I live in florida we don't really get a fall and winter, will this change my watering and caring habits? Thx and merry Christmas

    ReplyDelete
  71. When would you say is the best stage to transplant? I have mine in a very small pot, and i'd like to put them in a slightly larger tera cotta pot.

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  72. Just starting some lithops from seeds, 3 different types. They all germinated fairly well, about 80% in my special homemade starter mix. The information in your article will hopefully help me keep them alive. I was on the verge of overwatering them, but I seem to have nipped that problem in the bud.

    ReplyDelete
  73. Wow, the house plant care tips have been explained in a clear and price manner and the author has encouraged be to start taking care of house plants since it is an exciting job that decorates the house. I will bookmark this site so that I can visit it occasionally to break monotony from my job of offering Writing Service to high school, collage, and university students.

    ReplyDelete
  74. Should I bring my Lithops indoors for the summer? I live in Phoenix and if course it's way over 100 is that to hot for them?

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  75. My stone face plant is turning white and I'm not sure if it's because it wasn't in full sun before I bought it and I immediately put it in full sun or if it's mold.

    ReplyDelete